Historic Manhattan townhouse asks $28 million

Located in New York’s Greenwich Village, this townhouse was originally constructed in 1856. After extensive renovations restored the home to its original grandeur, it has recently gone on the market with an asking price of $28 million.

The current owners, Jay Newman and his wife, Elissa Kramer, first purchased the home in 1999 for $3 million. At the time, the townhouse had been subdivided into 6 different apartments. They invested a great of time and money renovating the property and restoring it as best they could to how the home would have looked back in the 1850s.

The townhouse is approximately 22 feet wide and 67 feet deep, which across its six stories comes to about 9,000 square feet. It has seven bedrooms, a chef’s kitchen, and two kitchenettes. The 131/2 foot ceilings make the whole interior feel open and expansive.

The home was designed by James Renwick Jr., a seminal figure in early American architecture. Although he had no formal education in architecture, he designed such famous and imposing structures as St. Patrick’s Cathedral in New York and the Smithsonian Institution’s Castle.

The home includes many historic design elements, such as the distinctive crown molding and the original ceiling medallions. The home also has six wood-burning fireplaces. In renovating the home, the sellers tried to restore the original look of the home as much as possible.

In addition to restoring the old, they also made a few needed updates, such as modernizing all the heating and electrics. They also added an elevator and a rooftop garden.

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